Vertigo

Talk about a turnaround.

This Alfred Hitchcock-helmed psychological thriller was misunderstood and ignored in its prime, yet has gone on to be hailed as one of the best American films ever made.

While it may have taken people time to pierce all the layers in a often very-complex tale of obsession and murder, the work was worth it.

Jimmy Stewart, playing somewhat against type, gets downright squirrely at times as a former cop who falls in love with a dead woman, and tries to shape her doppelganger into the original woman with tragic results.

Miss this one at your peril.

 

Rear Window

He likes to watch.

Confined to a wheelchair as he rehabs a broken leg, amiable Jimmy Stewart starts peeking at the neighbors with his trusty binoculars, only to stumble across murder most foul.

Maybe.

Our long ‘n lanky hero sees right through sweaty Raymond Burr, down there disposing of his “recently-departed” wife, but convincing anyone else of his suspicions may not be as easy as hoped.

One of Alfred Hitchcock’s best films, it earned the legendary director the fourth of his five Oscar noms as Best Director.

That he never won the award? The biggest crime of all.