Single White Female

You complete me.

Two of the best actresses of my lifetime — Jennifer Jason Leigh and Bridget Fonda — go toe-to-toe in a creepy lil’ psychological thriller which still lingers in the memory three decades later.

Fonda is a talented software designer, about to be married, a ray of sunshine to all she meets.

Meanwhile, Leigh is far darker, a young woman haunted by the loss of her stillborn twin, someone desperately searching for a companion she can call her own.

The duo come together as roommates, then things get seriously twisted, leading to a fateful showdown.

Still creepy, still compelling.

 

The Collector (1965)

Almost a love story.

Terence Stamp ventures into Norman Bates country as a decidedly proper, and ultra-creepy young man with a lot of secrets.

Taking a breather from pursuing butterflies, he turns to kidnapping, snatching Samantha Eggar and holding her prisoner in his old farm house in the middle of nowhere.

He’s doing it for true love, or so he repeatedly tells her, which is far from reassuring when you’re shackled in the cellar.

Director William Wyler, who copped his record 12th Oscar nomination for Best Director, still had the magic touch – crafting a tense chiller with a dark finale.

Play Misty For Me

Don’t answer the phone.

Released six months after I was born, this thriller gives us Clint Eastwood as a laidback, if not terribly bright, radio DJ who sleeps with the wrong woman and comes to regret it.

Long before Arrested Development and Archer made her a star for a different generation, Jessica Walter has a way with cutlery and a burning passion for not being ignored.

Sure she can reunite with Clint, even after doing some things which might make Fatal Attraction-era Glenn Close recoil, Walter is ready to slash her way to the top of the charts.

Unsane

Maybe they are out to get you.

The harder Sawyer struggles to convince people she’s paranoid for a reason, the more she looks like she’s lost it in this creepy thriller.

Shot entirely on an iPhone by always-innovative director Steven Soderbergh, the film follows a woman struggling to hold off a descent into madness.

Trapped in a mental hospital, is she being trailed by a stalker disguised as an orderly, or just fraying at the edges, unable to distinguish reality from betrayal by her brain?

As the walls close in, answers come, but they might not be ones she likes.